Dividend Investing versus High-Yield Savings

Dividend investing is one of the easiest ways to build long-term wealth. When companies pay out dividends, they are essentially sharing the profits they have earned with shareholders. Investors, especially those who are interested in income investing, tend to favor companies that pay high dividends. But stocks can be risky and some prefer to put their money into High-Yield Savings. Which is right for you?

What is Dividend Investing?

Dividend investing is the process of taking the dividend payments received from the company you own shares of and using them to buy more shares of the company’s stock. One way of automating this process is to enroll in a Dividend Reinvestment Plan (DRIP). A Dividend Reinvestment Plan is a plan in which shareholders have cash dividends automatically reinvested into additional shares of the firm’s common stock.

What is High-Yield Savings?

As the economy struggles through a recession, more people are looking to place their money in savings accounts. A high-yield savings account is an account opened at a bank or credit union that yields a higher than average rate of interest.

As the name suggest, these accounts have a higher Annual Percentage Yield (APY) than regular savings accounts. The advantages of having a high-yield savings account is that your money is highly liquid, it is FDIC insured, and you can get started with a low minimum balance in most cases. Depending on the bank, some accounts may come with other perks.

Rates of Return

The rate of return on dividend investing varies depending on the stock. It is common for dividend investors to only invest in a company’s stock that has a dividend yield of at least 4%. The yield of 4% gives investors the assurance that they will earn more than the average rate of inflation. Investors want to make sure they maintain purchasing power.

The Federal Reserve is keeping target interest rates low, which means that the yield on savings accounts are relatively low as well. Currently, there are some community banks that are offering interest rates as high as 5%. Investors that earn rates this high will be able to accumulate great wealth over the long-term. This yield is not very common. Most banks are offering interest rates of 1.5% to 3% on high-yield savings accounts.

Risks

There are also unique risks associated with dividend investing. A dividend stock still has some of the same risk as non-dividend stocks. Companies can experience periods where they are not earning profits, and therefore are not paying dividends.

High-yield savings accounts are FDIC insured, which means that they have zero principle risk. However, there is an inflation risk that is associated with high-yield savings accounts. When the inflation rate, which is usually around 3%, is higher than the yield you are receiving from the savings account, you lose purchasing power. Dividend investing also has inflation risk. The dividend return can be less than the inflation rate as well.

Tax Implications

There are specific tax implications related to dividend investing. Dividend payments are taxed as capital gains and not ordinary income. The current capital gain tax rate is 15% for those in the 25% of higher tax bracket. It is 0% for individuals who are in a lower tax bracket than 25%.

When considering taxes, dividend investing has an advantage over high-yield savings accounts. The interest earned from high-yield savings accounts are treated as ordinary income and taxed at your ordinary federal income tax rate.

Dividend investing and high-yield savings accounts both have their advantages and disadvantages. As with all investments, it is important to research them thoroughly. Investors typically choose investments that offer them the highest possible returns for their risk preferences